Cadderlie

Cadderlie
Cadderly
Cadderley,
Caderle
Calderlys
Cal-der-lys is thought to derive from the Gaelic for ‘the Burn at Deirdre’s Garden’ and certainly there were records showing an orchard once grew there until an excessively high tide and storm in the early 16th century overwhelmed it.1
In the bay in front, the tidal island is still called Eilean Uisneachan—Isle of the sons of Uisneach- and there are many references in the numerous versions of the legend of Deirdre, to the grassy meadow where she had a bower. The whole Loch Etive area, in fact, is strewn with ancient names remembering Deirdre and her lover so can 23 presume that there is some factual substance to the tale?2

was a Township on the West Bank of Loch Etive about 6 km NE of Bonawe.
It is now a bothy

http://canmore.rcahms.gov.uk/en/site/153668/

Eilean Uisneachan lies about 700 m east of Cadderlie
(dries to peninsula at LW?)
A small islet 70 m long?
In the bay in front, the tidal island is still called Eilean Uisneachan—Isle of the sons of Uisneach- and there are many references in the numerous versions of the legend of Deirdre, to the grassy meadow where she had a bower. The whole Loch Etive area, in fact, is strewn with ancient names remembering Deirdre and her lover so we can presume that there is some factual substance to the tale3

1300's
Cadderliemor : lands granted to Colin, Earl of Argyll from MacDougalls
It became part of the Priory lands and in
1560
- during the Reformation 5 merklands (the old measure of land value) of land at Cadderlymor, Cadderlybeg and Dalcadderley, suggesting three separate holdings, passed to Campbells of Ardchattan
1675
the Justiciary records reported that ‘John McKenich stoll away from Allan Stewart in Caderlie ane kow and was found in the verie act of flaying and taking off her hyde within his owne houss.’
1682
tack records forward indicate leases to a variety of Campbells
Laterly the township became home to the MacIntyres - originally of Glenoe across the other side of Loch Etive
1800
At the turn of the 18th century, Peter (Patrick) MacIntyre was tenant in
Cadderliemore and his two brothers in the adjacent farms. He must have
been a trusty fellow for he persuaded the laird, Campbell of Ardchattan, to
advance the tenants £8.13/-, his share of the building of the church at
Inverghuisachan on the opposite shore, allowing them to pay it back in
instalments.4
early 1800's
The rent was

4 fat lambs, 24 hens, 24 dozen eggs, the service for 4 days of one man and one woman and the upkeep of dykes, ditches, march dykes, wood enclosures and corn dykes

Somewhere nearby is a Mill ? does anyone know where ?

Into the 1900's and the population dwindled, as did the upkeep of the buildings
There were side schools maintained along the loch shore community to 1930, after the last family moved to Bonawe when their child was school age and when to Ardchattan school
The last known occupant was Angus MacVarish who was shepherd at Cadderlie until he moved to Glen Etive in 1948.5
It has long been popular with walkers, artists, and as shelter for shepherds.
In 1994 the Mountain Bothy Association took it over and it remains a unique and beautiful place to rest while exploring the Etive hills.

Read Mhairi Ross's research on Cadderlie here
http://www.lahsoc.org.uk/journals/journal_2011/10%20Between%20the%20burn.pdf

Cadderlie, on the north shore of Loch Etive, is more than just a bothy. In fact, the present building dates back a mere hundred years and belies the fact that, not so many years before that, a considerable community wrested enough from soil and sea to support generations of MacIntyres and MacGillivrays and MacColls. As far back as history documents, Cadderlie’s green sward has been home to princes and pilgrims, tacksmen and tillers and millers and minders of sheep, and sanctuary to exiled lovers.

1841

1851

1861

1871

1881

1891

Tax records

Dougie McLean - Eternity .. inspired by Cadderlie

http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/d/dougie_maclean/eternity.html

She loves me she loves me not
Where can this simple island boy begin?
This highland pride is all I've got
But in the darkness it means everything
It makes me one with the tide
It makes me strong when I'm burning inside

[Chorus:]
Standing here on Cadderlie
Between the burn and the turning sea
I gaze across on these golden hills
I'm looking… all the way to eternity
All the way to eternity…

I stand naked- I'm the Native one
I like to feel the wind across my face
I like to dream but maybe I should run
In case our tracks get covered & we leave no trace
No trace of where we have come
No trace of song we can hold for our young

Chorus

And I will sow this seed again…
And I will plant this field & know it's never ending…

I lose a son to the German wars
We'll lose the land he was fighting for
We lose our language to greed and gain
All washed away by a Southern rain
Washed until we can't see
What our own destiny meant us to be
Chorus


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