Bere

Bere
Barley
Hordeum vulgare
We have grown Barley as a food crop for many thousands of years.
It has been discovered as charred remains in neolithic settlements
It is a short season crop, so coping with our variable and often poor summers.
In the modern world it is still one of the most popular with the greatest cropping area across our farming land.

http://www.livingfield.co.uk/corn/landrace-1-bere/
http://www.livingfield.co.uk/tag/bere/
Bere is still available but in rare places.. this is a "landrace" seed, one that is harvested from each years crop.

http://www.livingfield.co.uk/corn/landrace-1-bere/
https://www.machairlife.org.uk/ML-Seed-Advice-leaflet.pdf

Fenton’s Food of the Scots [2] cites many records from the 1400s to the late 1800s of peas, beans and cereal grains grown alone or in mixtures. Similarly, the flours of peas, oats and bere were eaten as bread and bannocks, either as sole constituents or baked in combination.
Fenton A. 2007. The Food of the Scots. Volume 5 in A Compendium of Scottish Ethnology. Edinburgh: John Donald. Peas, peasemeal and bannocks appear in Ch 17 Bread and Ch 14 Field crops. Fenton cites: MacDonald J (1908) Editor of Stephens’ Book of the Farm for the loss of peas in preference to potato; and Hutchison R (1869) Report on the dietaries of Scotch agricultural labourers, (Transactions of the Highland and Agricultural Society, 4th, 2, 1-29).


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